“The Moral Imagination, Public Discourse, and the Culture of Life”

Reflections on Roe v. Wade and the Limits of Politics

January 26

The Society of St. George, Washington, D.C.

Douglas C. Minson
Vice President for Academic Affairs and Programs, The John Jay Institute

with a response from

Andrew Haines, President, The Center for Morality in Public Life

In January of 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its landmark ruling in the case of Roe v. Wade that ended legal protection for unborn human life in the United States. Despite few substantial impediments to abortion being adopted into law, 40 years later the country remains deeply divided on the issue—with no evident prospects for resolving the dispute. Is it possible to achieve meaningful public discourse about such a divisive and hotly contested matter?

In this lecture, Douglas Minson reflects upon the relationship of politics to culture and the implications of that relationship specifically for the debate over abortion. His reflections will consider such matters as the proper role of law in relationship to the formation and transformation of social habits, the manner in which social visions of the good life are communicated to successive generations, and the requisite conditions for substantial moral discourse.

For more information, contact Nancy Browne at nbrowne@johnjayinstitute.org or by telephone at 215-987-3000.

John Jay has been called the "father of American conservatism" and rightly so. His commitment to the rule of law and American constitutionalism was fundamentally informed by the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures as well as classical and medieval thought and the British system of law. As a man of the bar and bench he ranks high in the pantheon of in Anglo-American jurisprudence. Author (with Madison and Hamilton) of The Federalist Papers, Jay was President Washington's first choice for Chief Justice of the United States as well as President Adams's. I delightfully applaud the vision and work of the John Jay Institute for Faith, Society & Law in perpetuating the high constitutional principles and lasting legacy of their namesake among the future leaders of our great county."
The Honorable Kenneth W. Starr
Former Solicitor General of the United States
President, Baylor University