Mission and Vision

Named for the American founder, John Jay (1745-1829), the John Jay Institute is an educational and professional civic leadership organization based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Its mission is to prepare principled leaders for faith-informed public service. The John Jay Institute undertakes this mission to further nothing less than a renaissance of the animating ideals that inspired America's founding. As the only organization of its kind, the John Jay Institute provides exceptional emerging leaders with the intellectual, spiritual, and professional training for transformational cultural leadership.


The John Jay Institute operates post-graduate academic residential fellowships, executive seminars, lectures, conferences, and other programs designed to develop emerging leaders while concurrently building a professional fraternity of alumni to facilitate their strategic placement, ongoing networking, and lasting impact in American culture.

The Need and Opportunity

Financial corruption and economic collapse, the growth of the state, family breakdown, educational failure, a vulgar and dehumanizing culture are just some of the consequences of the loss of the public virtues and character traits once considered necessary for sustaining American self-government. The current crisis is not merely political; it is cultural – which is to say religious and spiritual at its root. Our times demand men and women of high principle, personal integrity, and undaunted courage who are grounded in the spiritual and intellectual tradition of the past and have the inspirational vision, prudential wisdom, and practical insight to lead our society into its future. Such leaders have shaped civilizations. They can renew and revive the American promise in our time.

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When a piece of ground is wanted for a use important to the State, I know the State has a right to take it from the owner on paying the full value of it; but certainly the legislature has no right to compel a freeholder to part with his land to any of his fellow-citizens, not to deprive him of the use of it, in order to accomplish one or more of is neighbors in the prosecution of their particular trade or business. Such an act, by violating the rights of property, would be a most dangerous precedent."
John Jay, Letter to Peter Jay Munroe, March 2, 1812